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“Didn’t Wash Hands” Alarm

Our friends at the CDC created a helpful website about hand washing, which is worth the time to read through.

Embrace the gay side 

safepiercing:

image

So while I was scrolling through tumblr today I saw this meme of a google search auto complete. This is something that comes up all the time at my studio and I’ve never thought to address it here.

Yes, at one point a single earlobe piercing was used to signify sexual orientation. A kind of…

squashverdi said: Thanks for clearing that up for me!! :)

Any time! :)

piercingexp:

New tees at Piercing Experience! Pick one up today to keep you looking cool during summer in the city. Modeled by our very own effervescent apprentice, @dropkickingtoddlers. 

Also be sure to follow us on Instagram and Facebook so you don’t miss anything fun! 

@piercingexp on IG 

facebook.com/piercingexp

Snazzy

smartsexyscientist:

brianskellie:

smartsexyscientist:

utter-fuckwad:

piercingsbyaj:

brianskellie:

A colleague quoted me and made this little sticker to inform clients.

To say the least, Brian knows what he’s talking about. This is great information to know for those of you who don’t already!

Because Brian Skellie Said So

I am not a piercer, but as a microbiologist, I have a few questions about this. If you’re using the autoclave correctly, everything should be killed. Nothing is going to ‘grow back’ after a proper autoclave session. (There are a very few microbes that are resistant to normal autoclave settings, but these are rare and highly controlled in the labs they’re studied in, the chances of them appearing on a average person’s jewelry is extremely low). And I’m not quite sure how ‘protein residues’ could possibly cause a bacterial/fungal/viral infection? Perhaps leftover toxins that are produced by certain microbes (i.e. S. aureus, a common skin microbe, can produce a toxin) could cause damage but it wouldn’t be an actual infection. And the vast majority of those toxin proteins (including the S. aureus toxin) are destroyed by the heat and pressure of the autoclave.

The only one of these that kind of makes sense is prions since as far as I know those are extremely difficult or impossible to decontaminate. But prions (the causative factor of ‘mad cow disease’, among others) are only spread through contaminated brain tissue, so I would think the likelihood of them appearing on a piercing would be extremely low.  

Not that I’m saying buying used body jewelry is a good idea. I personally would never want to buy used jewelry. But the scientific inaccuracies here don’t really inspire confidence in the piercer. If I saw this at a studio I went to get pierced at, I would turn around and walk right back out the door.

Hello microbiologist friend smartsexyscientist :)

These points were reduced from a much more involved conversation in the context of describing why sales of used body jewelry is an untenable business practice, and to discourage professionals from considering their autoclaves infallible. At a piercing studio, you wouldn’t want to have to question if someone had previously worn your jewelry or if it was new and safely handled prior to cleaning and sterilization.

If it is not clean, it can’t be sterilized.

A colleague cherry picked quips to keep it simple for a lay person to understand . As easy as it may be to pick it apart, it is clear that you got the message, and as a person who describes some understanding of steam sterilization, you already understand that an autoclave process should be effective against most pathogens. Prions are one harmful known protein type that are not destroyed by steam sterilization, and require more harsh means for removal from a surface. They are most often spread through contaminated brain and spinal tissue, but also through other kinds of nervous tissue, such as the tongue.

Another part of the problem when it comes to body jewelry is that the autoclave operator most likely does not have a background in clinical microbiology and infection prevention, and may not have optimal equipment to clean and sterilize jewelry. Most of the autoclaves used in North American piercing studios do not have dynamic air removal such as a vacuum or pressure pulsing system. They rely on gravity displacement and can not adequately sterilize hollow, porous or wrapped loads, which results in regrowth.

I do not condone appeal to authority, even when I’m the alleged authority. I am a person very interested in the specifics of “how clean is clean enough,” and to this end continue to study and participate in the related workgroups in the ASTM F04.15 subcommittee on on Material Test Methods.

We’ve been working on the problem of reliable validation for surgical implant reuse for philanthropic purposes for over a decade. For example, pacemakers can be still functional for years after explanted from a deceased individual. The concerns for failure are due to both infectious material (protein, bacterial, fungal and viral) that resists autoclave processes inside crevices and hollow or porous spaces, and endotoxin and pyrogen residues that can cause rejection, even without infection.

Biofilm and denatured proteins that can prevent effective decontamination are known problems with body jewelry. More on this subject here.

References of interest:

ASTM F2847 - 10 Standard Practice for Reporting and Assessment of Residues on Single Use Implants

WK32535 New Practice for Establishing Limit Values for Residues on Single use Implants

WK33439 New Guide for Standard test soils for validation of cleaning methods for reusable medical devices


I support the establishing evidence based standards for decontamination and sterilization of medical device and other surgical implants for reuse, if it can be done safely and consistently. Once that sort of process is standardized in medicine, then it might be applied to body jewelry. This shouldn’t be impossible, and may be forthcoming. A promising note is that there are processes to clean bone and tissue for allograft and implant from exogenous sources, such as cadavers, into patients in need. These sorts of things under clinical investigation may result in the standards we need for reprocessing body jewelry.

Until implants can be safely reused under routine conditions, we should not reprocess previously worn body jewelry for anyone but the original wearer’s own personal reuse.

Thank you for your detailed answer Brian Skellie! I did not know that prions could be transmitted via tongue tissue, or that the autoclaves used in piercing studios weren’t quite the same as the ones I’m used to in lab. This makes much more sense now. 

smartsexyscientist, I agree that the subject certainly deserves a more in depth discussion, and that the image alone is not enough. I’m glad it piqued your interest and that you were interested in more information.

Fantasy and Science Fiction: ‘Kiosk’ by Bruce Sterling | Beyond the Beyond | WIRED

Fantasy and Science Fiction: ‘Kiosk’ by Bruce Sterling | Beyond the Beyond | WIRED

THE FABRIKATOR WAS UGLY, noisy, a fire hazard, and it smelled. Borislav got it for the kids in the neighborhood.

One snowy morning, in his work gloves, long coat, and fur hat, he loudly power-sawed through the wall of his kiosk. He duct-taped and stapled the fabrikator into place.

The neighborhood kids caught on instantly. His new venture was a big hit.

The fabrikator made little plastic toys…

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What is Aseptic Non Touch Technique ANTT?

What is Aseptic Non Touch Technique ANTT?

Aseptic No Touch Technique may be used in conjunction with sterile gloves as an alternative to full surgical asepsis for body piercing procedures.
I demonstrated variations on this with colleagues during the Versatility in Piercing Techniques series of workshops for the 2014 APP conference.

The following is from www.antt.org: Aseptic No Touch Technique logo   ....used internationally to protect people from health care associated infection

Aseptic No Touch Technique
….used internationally to protect people from…

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joshverdi:

perrymdoig:

brianskellie:

smartsexyscientist:

utter-fuckwad:

piercingsbyaj:

brianskellie:

A colleague quoted me and made this little sticker to inform clients.

To say the least, Brian knows what he’s talking about. This is great information to know for those of you who don’t already!

Because Brian Skellie Said So

I am not a piercer, but as a microbiologist, I have a few questions about this. If you’re using the autoclave correctly, everything should be killed. Nothing is going to ‘grow back’ after a proper autoclave session. (There are a very few microbes that are resistant to normal autoclave settings, but these are rare and highly controlled in the labs they’re studied in, the chances of them appearing on a average person’s jewelry is extremely low). And I’m not quite sure how ‘protein residues’ could possibly cause a bacterial/fungal/viral infection? Perhaps leftover toxins that are produced by certain microbes (i.e. S. aureus, a common skin microbe, can produce a toxin) could cause damage but it wouldn’t be an actual infection. And the vast majority of those toxin proteins (including the S. aureus toxin) are destroyed by the heat and pressure of the autoclave.

The only one of these that kind of makes sense is prions since as far as I know those are extremely difficult or impossible to decontaminate. But prions (the causative factor of ‘mad cow disease’, among others) are only spread through contaminated brain tissue, so I would think the likelihood of them appearing on a piercing would be extremely low.  

Not that I’m saying buying used body jewelry is a good idea. I personally would never want to buy used jewelry. But the scientific inaccuracies here don’t really inspire confidence in the piercer. If I saw this at a studio I went to get pierced at, I would turn around and walk right back out the door.

Hello microbiologist friend smartsexyscientist :)

These points were reduced from a much more involved conversation in the context of describing why sales of used body jewelry is an untenable business practice, and to discourage professionals from considering their autoclaves infallible. At a piercing studio, you wouldn’t want to have to question if someone had previously worn your jewelry or if it was new and safely handled prior to cleaning and sterilization.

If it is not clean, it can’t be sterilized.

A colleague cherry picked quips to keep it simple for a lay person to understand . As easy as it may be to pick it apart, it is clear that you got the message, and as a person who describes some understanding of steam sterilization, you already understand that an autoclave process should be effective against most pathogens. Prions are one harmful known protein type that are not destroyed by steam sterilization, and require more harsh means for removal from a surface. They are most often spread through contaminated brain and spinal tissue, but also through other kinds of nervous tissue, such as the tongue.

Another part of the problem when it comes to body jewelry is that the autoclave operator most likely does not have a background in clinical microbiology and infection prevention, and may not have optimal equipment to clean and sterilize jewelry. Most of the autoclaves used in North American piercing studios do not have dynamic air removal such as a vacuum or pressure pulsing system. They rely on gravity displacement and can not adequately sterilize hollow, porous or wrapped loads, which results in regrowth.

I do not condone appeal to authority, even when I’m the alleged authority. I am a person very interested in the specifics of “how clean is clean enough,” and to this end continue to study and participate in the related workgroups in the ASTM F04.15 subcommittee on on Material Test Methods.

We’ve been working on the problem of reliable validation for surgical implant reuse for philanthropic purposes for over a decade. For example, pacemakers can be still functional for years after explanted from a deceased individual. The concerns for failure are due to both infectious material (protein, bacterial, fungal and viral) that resists autoclave processes inside crevices and hollow or porous spaces, and endotoxin and pyrogen residues that can cause rejection, even without infection.

Biofilm and denatured proteins that can prevent effective decontamination are known problems with body jewelry. More on this subject here.

References of interest:

ASTM F2847 - 10 Standard Practice for Reporting and Assessment of Residues on Single Use Implants

WK32535 New Practice for Establishing Limit Values for Residues on Single use Implants

WK33439 New Guide for Standard test soils for validation of cleaning methods for reusable medical devices


I support the establishing evidence based standards for decontamination and sterilization of medical device and other surgical implants for reuse, if it can be done safely and consistently. Once that sort of process is standardized in medicine, then it might be applied to body jewelry. This shouldn’t be impossible, and may be forthcoming. A promising note is that there are processes to clean bone and tissue for allograft and implant from exogenous sources, such as cadavers, into patients in need. These sorts of things under clinical investigation may result in the standards we need for reprocessing body jewelry.

Until implants can be safely reused under routine conditions, we should not reprocess previously worn body jewelry for anyone but the original wearer’s own personal reuse.

The professional in me just wants to applaud Brian for another amazing answer to an appeal, but the schoolyard kid in me is saying

"DON’T FUCKS WIT US, WE GOT A SKELLIE ON OUR SIDE"

So with this information it’s basically saying that even after processing and sterilizing our tools, they’re still not clean enough for reuse. Sounds like every piercer has to start using single use disposable products for every piercing

Yes, properly validated single use disposable instruments are one optimal choice, joshverdi. However, instruments are not left in the body for extended periods of time as jewelry would be, therefore regrowth is less of a risk with proper instrument processing. I switched to single use over 15 years ago, but still support appropriate instrument processing and provide training, products, and equipment through www.piercers.com with which to accomplish this as effectively as possible.

Anonymous said: Is 316l surgical steel good stuff?

damagedspoon:

brianskellie:

damagedspoon:

safepiercing:

316L is a common steel grade for lower cost body jewelry made in Asia and would not be considered acceptable for use in initial piercing by APP standards. 316L steel is a material more commonly referred to as “surgical steel” which is actually in reference to surgical tools, and not implants or items meant to be worn under the skin. 

Association of Professional Piercers jewelry standards would require steel used for initial piercing to be ASTM F-138 implant certified. Meaning it is tested and certified as being safe to wear under the skin

Ryan Ouellette, APP outreach

I’m not trying to be contrary, but when I have looked into medical implants (I have early onset arthritis in my knees), they encouraged me to look into 316L Stainless Steel and Titanium.

"Type 316L stainless steel is popular for surgical practices as it is the most corrosion resistant when in direct contact with biological fluid. […] This type of stainless steel is particularly effective as a surgical implant when in cold-worked condition. What makes the Type 316L ideal as an implant device is the lack of inclusion in this material." - http://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=7156

From what I can tell, the real debate among piercers seems to be between 316L (low carbon stainless steel) and 316LVM (low carbon vacuum melted stainless steel)?

damagedspoon
, the materials they mentioned to you are general designations so that you could learn more as a lay person. The specifications for steel, Ti or other materials for human implant are highly regulated starting with ISO and ASTM standards which are like recipes that include testing requirements for safety. Read more here
http://brnskll.com/shares/safe-steel/

You are a treasure trove of information! I looked at the ASTM website, but I couldn’t understand the recipes they gave me. :-)

Thanks, damagedspoon.

As with ISO, you have to pay for the full recipe publications. ASTM F138 is a five page detailed description of what the requirements for steel that has been used in the human body for decades are, and how to test for them. http://jewelry.safepiercing.org/ has the pertinent information summarized for you.

How It’s Made – Hypodermic Needles

This is very similar to what I saw when I visited Industrial Strength LLC Sharp Ass Needles…

More Information